Thursday, December 16, 2010

a thought on the paradox of zen's shikantaza (comments only)

4 comments:

  1. In our conscious experience of attempting an act unfortunately for its own sake, and not for the benefits that will accrue to us, unfortunately 'Thous' are always destined to become 'its.'

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  2. "Just sitting" is a practice not a philosophical mental exercise. To say, "it is the same concept in jewish religion known as "l'shma"." is fairly bold unless one has deeply practiced both. At the mental level zen and most mindful practices are at the apparent level filled with paradoxes.

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  3. mental exercises (mental activities in general) are not separate from practice. there is no duality mind-body. in practice one uses the contents of one's mind. before starting a practice, practitioners are aware of its philosophical meaning and purpose and on that basis they chose it. the creator of the practice arrived at it through his/her own reflective experiences. and even the concept of "no-purpose" is a philosophical concept. indeed one cannot speak "of" practice unless one is in it, but we can speak "about" it to some extent. the rational paradoxes in the concept of practice does not diminish its inherent intuitive value, quite the contrary.

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  4. thous do always become its, therefore we need to remain conscious of the effort to approximate thou in quotidian life to the utmost we are able to.

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